neoafrican:

My Childhood

14,822 notes

dynamicafrica:

DYNAMIC AFRICA HOLIDAY GIFT LIST ITEM #10: Art Books

Various books that cover different aspects of art throughout Africa and from African artists.

Unfortunately, I personally don’t own any of these books, yet. However, they’ve been sitting in my personal Amazon wishlist for what seems like forever so I thought I’d share them with you.

I’ve created a Dynamic Africa Amazon account and added these books to a public wishlist to make it easier for anyone interested in purchasing these books to access.

For more posts on African art and artists, this tag should sort you out.

Enjoy!

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

(via africaisdonesuffering)

404 notes

blackpoemusic:

Sonia Sanchez book jacket, 1970

blackpoemusic:

Sonia Sanchez book jacket, 1970

(Source: heytoyourmamanem, via blackcontemporaryart)

802 notes

shadowstookshape:


Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia E. Butler

shadowstookshape:

Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia E. Butler

60 notes

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Testimony: Vernacular Art of the African-American South : The Ronald and June Shelp Collection 
Complemented by more than 170 superlative illustrations and reproductions, this vivid look at African-American vernacular art celebrates the work of twenty-seven self-taught artists whose artistry captures the social, cultural, and spiritual experiences of African Americans in America’s South.

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Testimony: Vernacular Art of the African-American South : The Ronald and June Shelp Collection

Complemented by more than 170 superlative illustrations and reproductions, this vivid look at African-American vernacular art celebrates the work of twenty-seven self-taught artists whose artistry captures the social, cultural, and spiritual experiences of African Americans in America’s South.

(Source: africanafrican.com)

187 notes

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America’s First Black Public High School
Alison Stewart
“Dunbar had a life story, a heartbeat, and a reason for living…Teachers really instilled the idea, ‘don’t give up.’ The faculty was in the kids’ business. They talked to the neighborhood. They talked to the church. They had no problem calling a parent saying, ‘Your kid is not in class.’ Going to Dunbar meant you were part of something.”
 Paul Laurence Dunbar High School — also known as Dunbar High — was America’s first black public high school. Founded in 1870, Dunbar High has produced many of the nation’s pioneering black “firsts,” African-Americans who broke through barriers to become the first people of African descent to achieve in their fields — much like the poet after whom the school is named...”

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

First Class: The Legacy of Dunbar, America’s First Black Public High School

Alison Stewart

“Dunbar had a life story, a heartbeat, and a reason for living…Teachers really instilled the idea, ‘don’t give up.’ The faculty was in the kids’ business. They talked to the neighborhood. They talked to the church. They had no problem calling a parent saying, ‘Your kid is not in class.’ Going to Dunbar meant you were part of something.”

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School — also known as Dunbar High — was America’s first black public high school. Founded in 1870, Dunbar High has produced many of the nation’s pioneering black “firsts,” African-Americans who broke through barriers to become the first people of African descent to achieve in their fields — much like the poet after whom the school is named...”

(Source: thegrio.com)

323 notes

soulbrotherv2:

Children Of Strangers: The Stories of a Black Family by Kathryn L. Morgan
Collecting her family’s own stories and photographs, Kathryn Morgan has brought to life the attempts of five generations of black women to cope with the fears, angers, and anxieties of life in a hostile white society. Compiled in three parts - the Caddy Legends, childhood reminiscences, and Maggie’s memories of ‘color’ and ‘race’ - these tales are written in the southern, black oral tradition, and were told and re-told as emotional buffers against an inherently inhuman situation. 
According to the author, ‘family folklore was the antidote used by our parents, grandparents, and great grandparents to help us counteract the poison of self-hate engendered by racism.’ The two principal ‘warriors’ in these stories are Caddy, the author’s great-grandmother, slave-born fountainhead of the family’s oral tradition, and Maggie, the author’s mother, who could often ‘pass’ because her skin was so light. Through their recollections we receive an intense portrayal of everyday black life in a variety of settings and periods as well as characters and personalities. From Caddy’s home in Lynchburg, Virginia, to the successive generations that settled in North Philadelphia, the psychological effects of emotional and physical segregation are recounted in many telling and ironic episodes. Stories such as “How Caddy Found Her Mother,” “The Whipping and the Promise,” and “God and Lice” are profound in the truths they reveal. 
Attempting to make the family’s past applicable to the present, the stories invariably had the function of bolstering the individual’s self-esteem. The fifteen photographs included in the book help introduce the reader to the Morgan family. Too often traditional scholarship has presented black family life only in statistical aggregates or as a social problem. Children of Strangers is a new kind of evidence about black urban and ethnic life; it provides striking insights into the successful strategies used by black families to raise their children in a white-dominated world. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Children Of Strangers: The Stories of a Black Family by Kathryn L. Morgan

Collecting her family’s own stories and photographs, Kathryn Morgan has brought to life the attempts of five generations of black women to cope with the fears, angers, and anxieties of life in a hostile white society. Compiled in three parts - the Caddy Legends, childhood reminiscences, and Maggie’s memories of ‘color’ and ‘race’ - these tales are written in the southern, black oral tradition, and were told and re-told as emotional buffers against an inherently inhuman situation.

According to the author, ‘family folklore was the antidote used by our parents, grandparents, and great grandparents to help us counteract the poison of self-hate engendered by racism.’ The two principal ‘warriors’ in these stories are Caddy, the author’s great-grandmother, slave-born fountainhead of the family’s oral tradition, and Maggie, the author’s mother, who could often ‘pass’ because her skin was so light. Through their recollections we receive an intense portrayal of everyday black life in a variety of settings and periods as well as characters and personalities. From Caddy’s home in Lynchburg, Virginia, to the successive generations that settled in North Philadelphia, the psychological effects of emotional and physical segregation are recounted in many telling and ironic episodes. Stories such as “How Caddy Found Her Mother,” “The Whipping and the Promise,” and “God and Lice” are profound in the truths they reveal.

Attempting to make the family’s past applicable to the present, the stories invariably had the function of bolstering the individual’s self-esteem. The fifteen photographs included in the book help introduce the reader to the Morgan family. Too often traditional scholarship has presented black family life only in statistical aggregates or as a social problem. Children of Strangers is a new kind of evidence about black urban and ethnic life; it provides striking insights into the successful strategies used by black families to raise their children in a white-dominated world. [book link]

58 notes

black-culture:

The bestselling urban classic novel about a young woman coming of age in the late 1980s.
Tracy Ellison, a young knockout with tall hair and attitude, is living life as fast as she can. Motivated by the material world, she and her friends love and leave the young men who will do anything to get next to them. It’s only when the world of gratuitous sex threatens heartbreak that Tracy begins to examine her life, her goals, and her sexuality.

black-culture:

The bestselling urban classic novel about a young woman coming of age in the late 1980s.

Tracy Ellison, a young knockout with tall hair and attitude, is living life as fast as she can. Motivated by the material world, she and her friends love and leave the young men who will do anything to get next to them. It’s only when the world of gratuitous sex threatens heartbreak that Tracy begins to examine her life, her goals, and her sexuality.

214 notes

soulbrotherv2:

The Black List by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and Elvis Mitchell
In The Black List, twenty-five prominent African-Americans of various professions, disciplines, and backgrounds offer their own
stories and insights on the struggles, triumphs, and joys of black life in America and, in the process, redefine “black list” for a new century.
As seen in original portraits by renowned photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and in a series of incisive interviews conducted by award-winning journalist, critic, academic, and radio host Elvis Mitchell, this group exemplifies today’s most accomplished, determined African-Americans, whose lives and careers form a trail of inspiration and example for people of all races.
Spanning the arts, sports, politics, and business, the diverse accomplishments and lives of these remarkable individuals create a kaleidoscope of ideas and experiences, and provide the framework for a singular conver-sation about the influence of African-Americans on this country and on our world.

soulbrotherv2:

The Black List by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and Elvis Mitchell

In The Black List, twenty-five prominent African-Americans of various professions, disciplines, and backgrounds offer their own

stories and insights on the struggles, triumphs, and joys of black life in America and, in the process, redefine “black list” for a new century.

As seen in original portraits by renowned photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and in a series of incisive interviews conducted by award-winning journalist, critic, academic, and radio host Elvis Mitchell, this group exemplifies today’s most accomplished, determined African-Americans, whose lives and careers form a trail of inspiration and example for people of all races.

Spanning the arts, sports, politics, and business, the diverse accomplishments and lives of these remarkable individuals create a kaleidoscope of ideas and experiences, and provide the framework for a singular conver-sation about the influence of African-Americans on this country and on our world.

239 notes

soulbrotherv2:

Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel: Readings in the Interpretation of Afro-American Folklore (Critical Studies on Black Life and Culture) edited by Alan Dundes
Exploring the scope, diversity, and vitality of black culture, here is a fascinating collection of more than sixty articles from some of the most perceptive and authoritative commentators upon the black experience—Zora Neale Hurston, J. Mason Brewer, Sterling A. Brown, Eldridge Cleaver, Willis Laurence James, John Lovell Jr., Langston Hughes, Charles W. Chesnutt, Alan Lomax, Ralph Ellison, A. Philip Randolph, Newbell Niles Puckett, Roger D. Abrahams, and many others.
Readers cannot help coming away from this book with a new appreciation of the nature and richness of African American folklore. For those with little or no previous knowledge of this heterogeneous and spellbinding lore Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel will be an eye-opening encounter.
Drawn out of the deep, rich well of African American culture, these essays convey the import of the black folk experience for all Americans. No library or individual with a serious interest in African American folklore should fail to own this remarkable anthology.  [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel: Readings in the Interpretation of Afro-American Folklore (Critical Studies on Black Life and Culture) edited by Alan Dundes

Exploring the scope, diversity, and vitality of black culture, here is a fascinating collection of more than sixty articles from some of the most perceptive and authoritative commentators upon the black experience—Zora Neale Hurston, J. Mason Brewer, Sterling A. Brown, Eldridge Cleaver, Willis Laurence James, John Lovell Jr., Langston Hughes, Charles W. Chesnutt, Alan Lomax, Ralph Ellison, A. Philip Randolph, Newbell Niles Puckett, Roger D. Abrahams, and many others.

Readers cannot help coming away from this book with a new appreciation of the nature and richness of African American folklore. For those with little or no previous knowledge of this heterogeneous and spellbinding lore Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel will be an eye-opening encounter.

Drawn out of the deep, rich well of African American culture, these essays convey the import of the black folk experience for all Americans. No library or individual with a serious interest in African American folklore should fail to own this remarkable anthology.  [book link]

26 notes